See Our Progress

See Our Progress

Robbers Roost, Jon Krawczyk
Location #1

Robber’s Roost, fabricated from polished steel and enamel paint, and measuring nine feet high, was created by Jon Krawczyk. He pushes the boundaries of his medium by transforming steel and bronze into a study of the human condition. He is lauded for his ability to turn metal into large scale biomorphic sculptures that can strike one as having their own ubiquitous presence. Read about the artist.

Dyad, Martha Walker
Location #2

Dyad, a welded steel abstract plant sculpture, was created by artist Martha Walker. Her metal sculptures often express something deep and personal. Her large (6’10”) ‘Dyad’ is based on the scientific double helix and associated with romantic love. Her process of dripping liquid steel one drop at a time in order to build up massive forms allows for a unique combination of texture and line rarely seen in steel. Read about the artist.

Sandalphon, Harry Gordon
Location #4

Sandalphon, created in 2010 using black granite, is meant to become one with the environment which surrounds it. Using a crane to create his granite sculptures, Gordon believes that his work is not complete until it is viewed by the public. “It is as if they get their batteries charged with each person that sees them.” Read about the artist.

Oxidized Pod, Robert Koch
Location #5

Oxidized Pod, welded mild steel, was created by Robert Koch. His large (72”) welded work exemplifies his love of nature. Using rigid and lifeless materials, his work centers solely on steel sculpture inspired by organic movements found in nature. Each piece attempts to challenge the inherent behavior of the materials as if to capture aspects from nature such as the movements of a leaf in the wind, the swaying of reeds, or even the split second a seed begins to germinate. Read about the artist.

Gabriella, James Tyler
Location #6

Brickhead Gabriella is composed of 300 hand-carved ceramic bricks and is a personification of the Brazilian rainforests. Immense and immensely complex, the future history of mankind will be written in these leafy emerald worlds. Read about the artist.

Flight in Abstract, Bill Barrett
Location #7

Flight in Abstract has a sense of movement or dance of the abstract figures with the complex swirls and twists of intertwining bronze. This piece is a 51” by 45” by 21” fabricated bronze sculpture. Read about the artist.

Mingus II, Richard Heinrich
Location #8

Mingus II, welded steel sculpture, is a self portrait created by Brooklyn  native Richard Heinrich. He listens to music as he works in his Tribeca studio, and the titles of his work often reflect the strong influences of Charles Mingus, Thelonious Monk and others. Read about the artist.

Pi in the Sky III, Micajah Beinvenu
Location #9

Pi in the Sky III, fabricated from stainless steel and standing more than 17 feet high, was created by Micajah Bienvenu. His work combines technology with traditional, large scale design and fabrication to demonstrate the human experience.  Read about the artist.

Morning Dialogue, Ulla Novina
Location #10

Morning Dialogue, an Italian marble sculpture measuring 19” x 14” x 14”, was created by Ulla Novina. Together the stone and Ulla tell a story. Stone is star stuff and of the ages. She feels a kinship with stone. This awareness is expressed as she tries to integrate the nature of the stone with her vision of the nature of things. When she is successful, self and stone are held in a shared embrace. Read about the artist.

In Awe of Light, Patricia Lavin & John Richie
Location #11

In Awe of Light is an immersive composition consisting of three constructions. The arrangement is organized to reveal a secret hidden in light. “Opening”, “Noon”, and “Closing” consist of several elements. Read about Patricia Lavin.  Read about John Richie.

Ring Top Tower, Joel Perlman
Location #12

This is a special sculpture for the artist and remained in his personal collection for twenty years. About ten years ago Mr. Perlman decided to add the rings to the top as he had introduced circles to his work. He liked the result and sees this piece as a journey from hard edge to fluid motion.” Read about the artist.

Sail, Ken Hiratsuka
Location #13

Hiratsuka’s stone works are characterized by maze-like designs of infinite variation, always formed by one continuous line that never crosses itself. He often refers to his works as “fossils of movement.” They are both modern and ancient, a symbol of human communication through universal language on the surface of the earth as one huge rock. Read about the artist.

Magic in the Air, Jeffrey Breslow
Location #14

“This is a kinetic sculpture that was created to captivate the viewer’s attention with the subtle motion. The sculpture uses slight breezes of wind and the flexibility of thin steel rods to create movement of the eight small granite stones. The granite stones are in contrast to the 1,500 pound base boulder that is green serpentine that comes from a very small hidden quarry in the green mountain state of Vermont.”  Read about the artist.

Brickhead Iyemoja, James Tyler
Location #15 

Iyemoja, from West Africa, is the protector of all women, governing childbirth, conception, love, and healing. Read about the artist. See artist interview.

See Lorraine Meyer’s videos and photos of all the sculpture installations.

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John Richie

1991 BFA in Illustration, the University of the Arts, Phila., PA
1999 NJ State Council of the Arts Fellowship Grant in Crafts/Woodworking

Museum shows

● 1992. International Furniture Fair, NY, NY
● 1995. Philadelphia Furniture Show, Phila., PA
● 1996. SOFA, Miami, FL
● 1997. Philadelphia Furniture Show, Phila., PA
● 1999. ACC, Charlotte, NC
● 1999. Hunterdon Museum of Art, Clinton, NJ
● 1999. Morris Museum, NJ
● 2000. Philadelphia Furniture Show, Phila., PA
● 2000. The Artist’s Gallery, NJ
● 2000. Monmouth Festival of the Arts, NJ

John Richie

● 2001. Monmouth Festival of the Arts, NJ
● 2002. Philadelphia Furniture Show, Phila., PA
● 2003. Design and fabricate home furnishings for St James building, Phila.Pa.
● 2019. Broadfoot & Broadfoot Gallery, NYC. Solo exhibit.

Commissions – Multiple private residential furniture commissions in Philadelphia, PA and Naples, FL.

‘In Awe of Light’
Laurelwood Arboretum
Location #11

In Awe of Light is an immersive composition consisting of three constructions. The
arrangement is organized to reveal a secret hidden in light. “Opening”, “Noon”, and
“Closing” consist of several elements. An optic, created specifically for this project,
is fixed a top of a verde copper stanchion at a total height of 8 feet. Adorning the
side is a configuration of material that casts its form and color onto the ground in
shadow. In the foreground a white rectangle, 3’X6’, awaits the viewer, inviting them
to cast their shadow. A wonder appears!

 

Artist Statement: My goal in woodworking is to bring to environments furnishings that challenge convention; that intrigue the eye and mind; that express function in ways that surprise the viewer and delight the user. My work explores the relationship between ancient tribal art forms and contemporary urban life. With influences as diverse as Africa, Asia and the Americas, new synergies are generated from ancient dialogues. Ever since I was a student I have been fascinated by the aesthetics of tribal cultures, as well as mechanisms rooted in natural materials. What starts out as a vision soon becomes manipulated into a translation, leaving one with a sense of intrigue. As phenomena become intertwined through the convergence of cultures, the viewer is left with an awakened curiosity.

Patricia Lavin

Patricia Lavin was born in 1961 into a family of artists. Her earliest tutelage came from her uncle, Edward J. Lavin S J, a world renowned painter and writer. She attended WPU from 1980-1984, received accreditation in art history from American College, Greece, with a concentration in symbology in 1985–86, and completed her master’s studies at Parsons school of design in 1989.

Patricia Lavin

Throughout the 1990’s, Ms. Lavin worked on a diversity of projects designing everything from posters for music venues, theater sets, and costumes, to commercial interiors and vintage hot rod cars. Winning accolades for innovation and intellectual design approaches.

Returning to her roots as a painter, a full time course of studio work was a focus between 1999 -2005. Attending the Art students league in NYC she became a recipient of many awards and scholarships for excellence.

‘In Awe of Light’
Laurelwood Arboretum
Location #11

In Awe of Light is an immersive composition consisting of three constructions. The arrangement is organized to reveal a secret hidden in light. “Opening”, “Noon”, and “Closing” consist of several elements. An optic, created specifically for this project, is fixed a top of a verde copper stanchion at a total height of 8 feet. Adorning the side is a configuration of material that casts its form and color onto the ground in shadow. In the foreground a white rectangle, 3’X6’, awaits the viewer, inviting them to cast their shadow. A wonder appears! 

Presently, Patricia lives and works in New York City and exhibits a body of work generally once a year. Art films, music videos, sculpture and painting are her mediums of concentration.

Public work can be seen in Playa Ventana, Costa Rica, North Shore, Oahu Hawaii, and Lavallette, New Jersey. Many paintings are held in private collections worldwide.

 

Ulla Novina

Morning Dialogue, an Italian marble sculpture measuring 19” x 14” x 14”, was created by Ulla Novina.

Ulla Novina was born in Sweden and raised in the county of Skåne, an area known for its generosity of spirit, boisterous humor, and exuberant expression of life. In later years she lived in the county of Värmland, known for its mysterious forests and deep lakes. It is the county of dreamers, storytellers, poets, musicians, painters, and sculptors. The spirit of those counties fuels her creative self. The open spirit of the land of America and its adventurous freedom was the anvil needed to mold her work into its sculptural expression.

Ulla Novina

Together the stone and Ulla tell a different story. As Ulla Novina sees it, a sculptor can take one of two paths. The first is merely concerned with creating beauty. The other — the one taken by Novina — has more of a sense of urgency whose roots are influenced by ancient, artistic origins. Primitive art such as hand imprints found on the faces of rocks (made by Paleolithic peoples) or on rock slabs containing Viking runes (an alphabet dating back to the 1st or 2nd century AD) influence her contemporary work by declaring, “I am here.” — as observed by William Zimmer, Art Critic, from The New York Times.

‘Morning Dialogue’
Laurelwood Arboretum
Location #10

Sculpture and drawing studies include Sculpture Studio of Minoru Niizuma, NYC; New School of Social Research, NYC; Ridgewood School of Art and Design, Ridgewood, NJ; Art Student League, NYC and individual teachers who taught out of their own private studios.

In addition to creating art, she also lectures on art and sculpture. She is a former board member of the Art Center of Northern New Jersey, and the president of the Art Center Sculptor Affiliates. 

Solo exhibitions include Broadfoot & Broadfoot SoHo, NYC; Belskie Museum of Art and Science, Closter, NJ; Bergen Museum of Art and Science, NJ; Piermont Fine Arts Gallery, Piermont, NY.

Her work appears in permanent collections at Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; Schering-Plough Corporation, Madison, NJ; Bergen Museum of Art and Science, Paramus, NJ; and Broadfoot & Broadfoot Gallery, Boonton, NJ.

Artist Statement: “Stone is star-stuff of the ages,” writes Swedish-American sculptor Ulla Novina in the booklet accompanying her exhibition “Self and Stone” at Broadfoot & Broadfoot Gallery in Soho. And it is with the ages Novina concerns herself; she tells stories through marble, onyx, travertine, and river stone, stories as old as the stone itself. “Secret Gate” (a piece in Italian marble) evokes ancient cities and forbidden paths, “Ancient Sign” (in Italian travertine) has mystical, religious undertones to it, and “Whispers from the Past II” (in gorgeous pink Portuguese marble) is a quiet, contemplative sculpture, like a memento from another era.

Ken Hiratsuka

Sculptor Ken Hiratsuka was born in Shimodate City, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. He graduated in 1982 from Musashino University of Art in Tokyo. In that same year, he came to New York City and he received a fellowship from the Art Student League.

His sculpture ‘Sail’ is located at Site 13 in Laurelwood Arboretum.

Hiratsuka’s stone works are characterized by maze-like designs of infinite variation, always formed by one continuous line that never crosses itself. He often refers to his works as “fossils of movement.” They are both modern and ancient, a symbol of human communication through universal language on the surface of the earth as one huge rock. Committed to art for everyone, he began sculpting the slate and granite sidewalks of New York City, becoming a figure in the Street Art Movement of the 80’s.

Hirasuka Sail

Driven by his vision of art’s capacity to transcend the differences of nations and languages, his work can now be seen in permanent public sites in both urban and natural environments in 21 countries.  

Hiratsuka’s commissioned works include sculptured sidewalks, building facades and entranceways, water sculptures and gardens.  His public monuments include his 12 boulder “Peace Monument” for the Japanese

               Ken Hiratsuka                      Sail  Location  #13

Gardens of Cowra, Australia; “One Line Tower” – 40 tons by 30 feet high – in Yuzi Paradise Sculpture Park in Guilin, China; “One Line Boulder”, a 2003 commission for the city of Chikusei, Japan; and “River”, a 100 foot long carved granite sidewalk at 25 Bond in New York City.

Artist Statement: “I hope that those who see my work will discover new aspects of life, deeper levels of experience of which they may be only dimly aware. I want to inspire people to become more conscious of nature and our common humanity. No matter how lifestyles change, the basic self remains the same. I want to help bring human beings together. In my art there are no social, economic, cultural, or political distinctions. We are all one.”

Jon Krawczyk

‘Robber’s Roost’ fabricated from polished steel and enamel paint measuring 9 feet high was created by Jon Krawczyk.

Krawczyk pushes the boundaries of his medium by transforming steel and bronze into a study of the human condition. Lauded for his ability to turn metal into large scale biomorphic sculptures that can strike one as having their own ubiquitous presence.

He draws inspiration from renowned modern masters such as Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Henry Moore and David Smith. He is not only influenced by the obviously masterful techniques of these artists, but also by the philosophical tenets of their sculpture practice.

His work also has a conceptual side, that dovetails with the physicality of making art and the objects that result from that material action, such as energy and matter. Krawczyk cuts, pounds, and welds sheets of bronze and stainless steel to fabricate smooth, monolithic forms that look as though they were carved by a samurai slicing clay. At the same time, the highly polished sculptural

Jon Krawczyk
Photo Credit: Dave Teel Photography
Robbers Roost

‘Robber’s Roost’
Laurelwood Arboretum Location #1

profiles of his “Smoke” and “Glacé” series suggest raw stone yet evoke vaporous shapes and melting ice. There are echoes of Isamu Noguchi in this work, as it sits at the intersection of natural and manmade forms. Additional traces of Henry Moore can be found in a consistent concern with volume and abstract figuration.

Hailing from Boonton, NJ and a graduate of Connecticut College in New London, CT, Krawczyk studied fine art throughout Europe before moving west in the 1990s. Early in his career he apprenticed with many acclaimed sculptors who were considered icons of the second generation of great American metal sculptors. Over the last 20 years, Krawczyk has parlayed these key life experiences into his aesthetic approach and studio practice.

 

He has exhibited in several galleries across the United States and placed in many prestigious private art collections around the world. Several of Jon Krawczyk’s most recent projects are large-scale, site-specific, public art installations at high profile locations in Silicon Valley-San Francisco Bay area, Seattle-Bellevue region, Los Angeles-Beverly Hills, Metropolitan New York, NY / Newark, NJ area.

Selected solo exhibitions include Garboushian Gallery, Beverly Hill, CA; Broadfoot & Broadfoot Gallery, NYC; Lumina Gallery, Taos, NM; and KL Fine Art, Chicago, IL

Micajah Beinvenu

Pi in the Sky III, fabricated from stainless steel and standing more than 17 feet high, was created by Micajah Bienvenu. His work combines technology with traditional, large scale design and fabrication to demonstrate the human experience. His pieces evoke emotion that invite us into spaces that reflect the enormity of the natural world and the human experience in relation to it in the moment.

Micajah studied sculpture at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington. A celebrated Pacific Northwest sculptor, he now resides in Vermont where his contemporary sculptures are conceived in a 3D modeling program and fabricated in his studio.

His work is best known for its graceful twisting and turning sculpture made from carefully crafted stainless steel metal. According to the artist, “my work is meant to inspire and uplift. I believe art

‘Pi in the Sky III’
Laurelwood Arboretum Location #9

should make us feel better. With its emphasis on curves, lines and seams, my work has been described as 3-D abstract paintings.”

Micajah Bienvenu
Micajah Bienvenu

Recent public commissions include Washington States Arts Commission, Art in Public Places Program, South Seattle College, Seattle, WA; Thurman Street Bridge, Portland DOT, Portland, OR; Town Icon Sculpture, Town of Friday Harbor, WA.

Selected exhibitions include Matzke Galley of Fine Art and Sculpture Park, Camano Island, WA; Gallery Without Walls, Lake Oswego, OR; Salem Art Works, Salem, NY; Art in the Parks, Westchester County, NY; and his work is included in corporate collections including MacDonald’s Corporate Headquarters, Seattle, WA; Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Renton, WA; Nordstrom Corporate Headquarters, Seattle, WA; Spears Plastics, Los Angeles, CA.

Artist Statement: In the early part of my career my studio was in close proximity to heavy industry in Seattle and I was exposed to many large-scale fabrication techniques. This really expanded my ideas of what was possible with my art making. I am inspired by forms found in nature and science. I particularly love the fluidity of form found in the natural environment such as vines, tree roots, water currents and the paths of subatomic particles.

 

Bill Barrett

‘Flight in Abstract’
Laurelwood Arboretum Location #7

“Flight in Abstract,” a 51” by 45” by 21” fabricated bronze sculpture was created by renowned artist, Bill Barrett. The piece has a sense of movement or dance of the abstract figures with the complex swirls and twists of intertwining bronze. Barrett is known primarily for his large-scale outdoor public sculptures of fabricated aluminum, bronze, or steel that address the interplay between positive and negative space with grace, elegance and exquisite balance.

Barrett earned a BS degree and an MS degree in Design from the University of Michigan, and later a Master of Fine Arts degree from the same institution. He has taught at Eastern Michigan University, the Cleveland Institute of Art, SUNY New Paltz, Queens College and Columbia University.

In 2011, his commemorative bronze sculpture ‘911’ from his Lexeme Series was installed for temporary display in Tribeca’s Finn Square Park in New York. The work, which combines abstract and representational elements, has been celebrated for its graceful tribute to the tragic terrorist events of September 11, 2001.

Bill Barrett
Tango

‘Tango’
William Paterson University

Over the past forty years, he has exhibited regularly in New York and Santa Fe in solo and group exhibitions. His works are represented in the collections of Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, New Jersey, the Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico,  the Knoxville Museum of Art in Tennessee, and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond.

His 9-foot work ‘Tango’ can be seen outside the Cheng Library on the campus of William Paterson University in Wayne, New Jersey.

Artist Statement: Abstract art is like music in that when you listen to a song, everyone has different ideas about it, feels different emotions because of it. Even the same person listening to a piece at different times will feel differently. That’s true of abstract art. As a viewer, you can interpret it for yourself as well as seeing what the artist made. That’s what I like about abstract art: you get a chance to participate.

Martha Walker

Dyad, a welded steel abstract plant sculpture, was created by artist Martha Walker. Her metal sculptures, made from meticulously dripped molten steel, often express something deep and personal. Her large (6’10”) ‘Dyad’ is based on the scientific double helix and associated with romantic love. Her process of dripping liquid steel one drop at a time in order to build up massive forms allows for a unique combination of texture and line rarely seen in steel.

Martha Walker

Martha attended Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York where she obtained a BFA degree in Fine Arts and a Master’s degree in Art Education, Honors.     

‘Dyad’
Laurelwood Arboretum
Location #2

Recent group exhibitions of her work include Currently 80, Sculptures Guild Group Show at the Westbeth Gallery, New York; Summer Exhibition, Studio 80+ Sculpture Grounds; New Conceptions, Sculpture Guild, Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation, New York; Texas Contemporary International Art Fair, Denis Bibro Fina Art; Politics in Art: From Warhol and Rauschenberg to the Present Day, Chautauqua Institution, Chautauqua, New York. 

Recent solo exhibitions include Turning Inward, Denis Bibro Fine Art, Chelsea, New York and Broken World, Anxious Heart, The Sylvia Wald and Po Kin Gallery, New York.

In 2019, her “Separation Anxiety” sculpture was selected for the final episode of season seven of ‘Orange is the New Black’ television show.

Artist Statement: Throughout my tedious process, time passes quickly, while at the same time, stands still. I am fueled by an obsessive drive to create something personal and unique through my art with the finite time that my life affords me. With every line, each silhouette, and form, I ask myself: Is it pure? Is it Me? Have I shown integrity in my process to reflect my own truth? The results must be as strong and effective as humanly possible. For me, that is all that there is.

Harry Gordon

Sandalphon, created in 2010 using black granite, it is meant to become one with the environment which surrounds it. Using a crane to create his granite sculptures, Gordon believes that his work is not complete until it is viewed by the public. “It is as if they get their batteries charged with each person that sees them,” stated the artist.

Primarily using wood and granite for his pieces, Gordon’s work is often viewed as being “larger than life.” By only using wood which has been removed for other purposes or from a tree which has fallen naturally, Gordon’s shows his appreciation and sensitivity to nature and his environment.

Born in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, he received his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in sculpture from Syracuse University in 1983. In 1987, he moved to New Jersey to earn his Master of Fine Art degree in sculpture from Rutgers University, and he has lived in the state since that time.

Harry Gordon with Sandalphon

Gordon began sculpting in a community art class and was an apprentice to Boris Blai, a classically trained Russian figurative sculptor who had worked in Auguste Rodin’s studio. Gordon began his sculpture career with a very classical, figurative approach but now creates larger-than-life organic sculptures that are designed to “exist naturally in the landscape.”

‘Sandalphon’
Laurelwood Arboretum
Location #4

Gordon’s work has been included in exhibits at the Genest Gallery, Lambertville, NJ; Carnegie Center Greenway, Princeton, NJ; New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, NJ; Grounds for Sculpture, Hamilton, NJ; The Gallery at Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ; 1995; the Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie, Cadwalder Park, Trenton, NY; the Station Plaza Sculpture Walk, Trenton, NJ; and SUNY Plattsburgh Sculpture Park, Plattsburgh, NY.

Major solo exhibitions include Harry H. Gordon at Morris Arboretum, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Outdoor Sculpture at the Chapin School, Princeton, NJ; and the Woodmere Art Museum, Philadelphia, PA.

Harry Gordon is now the owner of Harry Gordon Studios, a company which handles and moves sculptures.

Artist Statement: When I begin working with a piece of wood, I rotate it until I find a position where it begins to work as a sculpture. Then I start carving. Wood has a spirit and a natural gesture within it.

Jeffrey Breslow

Magic in the Air, painted steel roads and granite stones, was created by lifelong Chicagoan Jeffrey Breslow. A nature lover, his inspiration unusually starts from nature; in this case stones. He received his BFA degree in Industrial Design from the University of Illinois where his instructor Edward Zagorski introduced him to design—a dimension of creation beyond making and shaping.

His enthusiasm for design brought a sense of play to his fascination with form and construction and soon he recognized that designing children’s toys and games was the perfect synthesis. Breslow spent 41 years as a renowned toy designer and was president and CEO of Big Monster Toys until 2008, when he chose to pursue his first passion of sculpting full-time.

His solo exhibition Boulder & Boulder appeared at Willis Tower in Chicago. Other exhibitions include the International Sculpture Outdoor Exhibition in Chicago, the Chicago Flower and Garden Show, and One of A Kind Show at The Merchandize Mart in Chicago.

Jeffrey Breslow

‘Magic in the Air’
Laurelwood Arboretum
Location #14

He has exhibited his sculptures at a variety of shows including the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art in Colorado, the Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art in Ohio, Hofstra University in Hempstead on Long Island, Manhattan Community College, and at Pier Walk 98 in Chicago.

Artist Statement: My Abstract Sculptures begin with extraordinary boulders and stones, the shapes of which inspire my steel structures. All of which kindles a conversation between human creativity and the natural world. My sculptural forms cause the viewer to appreciate a common connection to nature and affirm the ability to shape our world in exceptional ways.

Joel Perlman

RING TOP TOWER, welded steel, was created by Joel Perlman. For Perlman, sculpting is an adventure and each work is the record and result of an exploration of weight, danger, negative space, and monumentality. His process is one that is tied closely to the materials and to the construction and deconstruction that take place during the creation of his sculpture. Perlman often starts by cutting shapes, primarily out of steel, and then welds them together to create the sculpture.

The obvious joining lines, surface nicks and scratches record the process of creation, are evidence of the hand of the artist, and articulate a relationship between painting and sculpture. There are no preliminary drawings, for Perlman sees his work as evidence of a process, and the result of an activity. Perlman’s sculptures contain an acknowledged influence of Russian Constructivism in their glory of the geometric form. His works are also known for the central, open spaces that are integral to his work. These negative spaces help define the work and are as important to Perlman as the sculpture itself.

Joel Perlman

‘Ring Top Tower’
Laurelwood Arboretum
Location #12

He was born in New York in 1943. While an undergraduate student at Cornell University, he learned to weld by taking adult education classes off-campus. This activity became a great influence as he learned alongside bikers, farmers, and truck drivers. He earned a BFA at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY in 1965, and an MA degree from the University of California, Berkley in 1967. Perlman has been an instructor at the School of Visual Arts in New York City since 1973.

Selected awards include a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in 1979; The Special Prize from the second Fujisankei Biennale; and Japan Commission for the Tenneco World Headquarters, in 1995. His work is included in the public collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City; Storm King Art Center, Mountainville, NY; and the Utsukushi-Ga-Hara Open Air Museum, Japan.

Recent solo exhibitions include Loretta Howard Gallery, New York and ILLE Arts, Amagansett, New York.

Artist’s Statement: About the process of welding, Joel Perlman has said, “I was immediately transfixed by the whole process. The raw power at your disposal, that you could take two pieces of metal, there would be a flash and a buzz, and suddenly they’re one single piece…I felt I’d found a work process that could keep up with my thought process.”

Robert Koch

Oxidized Pod, welded mild steel, was created by Robert Koch. His large (72”) welded work exemplifies his love of nature. Using rigid and lifeless materials, his work centers solely on steel sculpture inspired by organic movements found in nature. Each piece attempts to challenge the inherent behavior of the materials as if to capture aspects from nature such as the movements of a leaf in the wind, the swaying of reeds, or even the split second a seed begins to germinate.

Growing up in Pennsylvania, his interest in art started at an early age. He attended Kutztown University, where he studied art education. Over the course of nearly 20 years, he created functional stoneware pottery and traveled the east coast selling work at art festivals.

Robert Koch
Oxidized Pod

‘Oxidized Pod’
Laurelwood Arboretum
Location #5

In 2000, he registered in a metal sculpting class at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and knew immediately that this indeed was a calling. In 2004, he made the life-changing decision to move from rural Pennsylvania to the NYC area and transition Robert Koch Studios as an artist working solely on steel sculpture.

Robert’s list of public and corporate commissions is rapidly growing. His work recently received a place of honor in his adopted hometown of Jersey City. The Mack-Cali Realty Corporation has installed his nine large spheres in its headquarters, the Harborside Atrium. The orbs descend from the ceiling at various heights, and the dark globes of open metalwork are illuminated against the white ceiling glass.

Recent group exhibitions of his work included Celebrations and Beginnings II at OTA Contemporary in Sante Fe, New Mexico.

Robert-Koch-sculpture-harborside-jersey-city

Richard Heinrich

Mingus II, welded steel sculpture, was created by Brooklyn native Richard Heinrich. He listens to music as he works in his Tribeca studio, and the titles of his work often reflect the strong influences of Charles Mingus, Thelonious Monk and others.

Works by Richard Heinrich can be seen in the collections at The Donald M. Kendall Sculpture Gardens at PepsiCo in Purchase, New York; Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University, New Brunswick campus; the New York Public Library in Manhattan; Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; and at corporate headquarters and private homes across the country.

Richard Heinrich

He has exhibited his sculptures at a variety of shows including the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art in Colorado, the Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art in Ohio, Hofstra University in Hempstead on Long Island, Manhattan Community College, and at Pier Walk 98 in Chicago.

‘Mingus II’
Laurelwood Arboretum
Location #8

Artist Statement: I have been a sculptor for more than five decades, working most of the time in steel. My grandfather founded the Heinrich Iron Works in 1905 in Brooklyn. My father, a civil engineer, passed on the construction affinity to me and as an art student I gravitated to the material. Steel is incredibly malleable and very strong. It can withstand stress and bad weather like no other sculpture material. Bronze is prone to rot and marble can chip and break. Wood can be carved but will burn and splinter. And as an added incentive steel is very inexpensive. My lower Manhattan studio and home afford me the opportunity to see and interact with the robust art environment in New York City. To have work in a sylvan glade in New Jersey is a pleasant contrast to the hurly burly of Manhattan.

James Tyler

Iyemoja is an Orisha from the Yoruba religion of West Africa. She is the protector of all women, governing childbirth, conception, love, and healing. According to myth, when her waters broke, it caused a great flood creating rivers and streams. Iyemoja also traveled in slave ships to the Americas where she evolved into a revered goddess of the sea among practitioners of Brazilian Umbandu and Candomble, Cuban Santeria, and Haitian Voodou.

James Tyler
Brickhead Iyemoja, James Tyler Sculptor.

Brickhead Iyemoja – Laurelwood Arboretum Location #15

James Tyler’s Brickhead installations are unique colossal heads that invite us to identify with the world’s ceramic heritages. They bring today’s faces together with pre-Columbian, South American, Native American, Asian, African, and Western influences. Gallery Director Mark Ruschman noted, “There is something timeless in Tyler’s Brickhead sculptures, reminiscent perhaps of the temple carvings of Angkor Wat or the great Toltec heads of Central America. Yet they are clearly contemporary, relics of a civilization not yet past…The ponderous weight of the brick constructions is juxtaposed with the ethereal nature of time.” At the same, the heads are stylized portraits of everyman and everywoman. They are unique yet universal. They are us.

For ancient peoples, colossal stone and clay heads, such as those created by the Toltec, Olmec and other cultures in central Mexico, often symbolized their connections with the spirits they worshipped, and these, in turn, often represented the elements, such as rain and sun, or other larger-than-life phenomena, such as death and love. Each culture created large heads to suit its own purposes. The Toltecs created large ceramic heads symbolizing their indigenous culture and values, yet scholars differ in their analyses of the origins and meanings of these works. Tyler’s easy way of replacing the gods with our own visages is, in a way, Socratic. Socrates insisted that the gods on Mount Olympus were only representations of a higher being. By choosing to represent all of humanity, the here and now that exists outside of cultural considerations, Tyler is having his own Socratic dialogue with pre-Columbian artists. [From Tyler’s website, tylersculpture.com]

Gabriella –
Laurelwood Arboretum Location #6